Josie, Civil War lace-up Boot
Lace up boot
Josie, Civil War lace-up Boot

Josie is a women’s Civil War lace-up boot.  It has softer lines and leather. 1 1/4″ stacked heel, rounded toe.

full and half sizes 5-12 in wide EE only  Price $199.00

not rated $199.00 Select options
Stella, Civil War Ladies Boot
Stella, Civil War Ladies Boot
Stella: All leather, no out of period rubber heels.   Lace-up boot is made from full grain black smooth leather.   Stella has a 1-inch leather heel and a full toe area.  This will keep you comfortable all day. Full and half sizes 5 – 11
not rated $189.99 Select options

The elastic gusset assures that there is no problem with ankle fit as you might find with the calf-high button shoes or lace-up boots sometimes called Shady Lady. The Shady Lady actually dates from 1883. It is fine for Cowboy shooting sports but out of place during the Civil War.  STELLA-A ladies lace up boot. Sturdy enough for around the camp and comfortable enough for all day.  Natural Half Boot (NHB), this boot later became the proper, “four inches above the ankle” Jefferson Bootee for 1812, Seminole War and Mexican War. Remember, all laced shoes were called “Jefferson” until the 1880s. Fugawee’s laced half-boot is a left-right model of the Hi-Lo Trekker. It is built in a completely new and roomier last adapted from originals. If you look at the American Rifleman article on muskets of the Revolution, you will see that Troiani portrays General Warren standing atop the parapet with a sword in hand as he waits to see “the whites of their eyes.” He is wearing black Hi-Lows / Black Half Boots. One detail from the surviving 18th c. boots: where the original lacing survives, it’s always “spiral” laced, that is the length of a thong is knotted at one end [the bottom], and it spirals round and round up the front opening, then is half-hitch looped, and the other end tucked inside the boot……. DA Saguto. An ideal trekking boot, soon to be the US Army regulation footwear, the hi-low would have been the laced boot favored by President Jefferson as the footwear for the Brigade he sent into the wilderness.  In the United States, Thomas Jefferson was a strong supporter of the French Revolution so, at his inauguration in 1801 he wore laced-up shoes.. This set a fashion. All laced shoes soon were called “Jefferson Shoes.”
The term “Jefferson” continued to mean laced shoes until the early twentieth century. “Bootee” is a diminutive of “Boot” and signifies a short boot. “Brogan” is derived from “Brogue”, an English term for a rugged shoe that almost covered the ankle as opposed to a shoe which was lower and a boot which was higher. Fugawee’s contract Bootee has four lace holes.  Federal Contract Bootee. It has five lace holes and a pull tab on the back of the boot. Fugawee brogans come from the factory with fabric laces but we put a pair of leather laces in every box so that you can have your choice. Here, too, you will find the regs for the Mexican War. “Mounted officers wore high military boots, while other officers had the short boots. ” Bootees were worn by the enlisted men of all corps, “under the pantaloons, laced, extending four inches above the ankle joint.”  Lace pattern buckle holds by friction. Looks nice on Martha. Everyman’s Brogans, latchets with laces. Boots, also much used. Country people used highland calf-length laced front boots.  Lower class men’s brogans rough side out. small buckle. Leather shoe is worn with almost anything to 1780. Latchet’s made with eyelet hole for laces or ribbons, no buckle. in 1714 Leather riding boots, laced well above the ankle tied in a bow, bootstraps, and vamps with silk rosettes.  in 1800 Women’s boots popular, ankle high, laced up the front.  in 1837 Plain black slippers, heel-less ribbon laced.